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Books about America’s Founding Fathers (and Mothers)

There’s no better time than the present to look back at the past! America’s history is rich with stories of women and men who stood up for their beliefs and helped make our country what it is today. As we teach the next generation how to strive towards a more perfect union, it’s helpful to take a look back at the lives of the people who worked to found our country in the first place. Here are some excellent books about America’s Founding Fathers and Mothers to share with your young readers!

 

Leave It to Abigail!

by Barb Rosenstock; illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley

Everyone knew Abigail was different. Instead of keeping quiet, she blurted out questions. Instead of settling down with a wealthy minister, she married a poor country lawyer named John Adams. Instead of running from the Revolutionary War, she managed a farm and fed hungry soldiers. Instead of leaving the governing to men, she insisted they “Remember the Ladies.” Instead of fearing Europe’s kings and queens, she boldly crossed the sea to represent her new country. And when John become President of the United States, Abigail became First Lady, and a powerful advisor.

 

Most Wanted: The Revolutionary Partnership of John Hancock and Samuel Adams

by Sarah Jane Marsh; illustrated by Edwin Fotheringham

John Hancock and Samuel Adams were an unlikely pair of troublemakers. Hancock was young and dashing. Adams was old and stodgy. But working together, they rallied the people of Boston against the unfair policies of Great Britain and inspired American resistance. And to King George, they became a royal pain. When the British army began marching toward Lexington and Concord, sending Hancock and Adams fleeing into the woods, the two men couldn’t help but worry–this time, had they gone too far?

 

Guts & Glory: The American Revolution

by Ben Thompson

From George Washington crossing the icy Delaware, to Molly Pitcher fearlessly firing her cannon, the people of the American Revolution were some of the bravest and most inspiring of all time. Jump into a riot in the streets of Boston, join the Culper Spy Ring as they steal secrets in the dead of night, and watch the signing of the Declaration of Independence in this accessible, illustrated guide to the birth of the United States.

 

Thomas Paine and the Dangerous Word

by Sarah Jane Marsh; illustrated by Edwin Fotheringham

As an English corset-maker’s son, Thomas Paine was expected to spend his life sewing women’s underwear. But as a teenager, Thomas dared to change his destiny, enduring years of struggle until a meeting with Benjamin Franklin brought Thomas to America in 1774-and into the American Revolution. Within fourteen months, Thomas would unleash the persuasive power of the written word in Common Sense-a brash wake-up call that rallied the American people to declare independence against the mightiest empire in the world.

 

Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nation

by Cokie Roberts; illustrated by Diane Goode

Beautifully illustrated by Caldecott Honor–winning artist Diane Goode, Ladies of Liberty pays homage to a diverse selection of ten remarkable women who have shaped the United States, covering the period of 1776 to 1824.  Drawing on personal correspondence and private journals, Cokie Roberts brings to life the extraordinary accomplishments of these women who created the framework for our current society, a generation of reformers and visionaries.

 

John, Paul, George & Ben

by Lane Smith

Once there were four lads… John [Hancock], Paul [Revere], George [Washington], and Ben [Franklin]. Oh yes, there was also Tom [Jefferson], but he was annoyingly independent and hardly ever around. These lads were always getting into trouble for one reason or another. In other words, they took a few…liberties. And to be honest, they were not always appreciated.

This is the story of five little lads before they became five really big Founding Fathers.